SHCS reviews its successes, tests

By: By Amber Hatten-Staley - Assistant editor
Amber Hatten-Staley | Laurinburg Exchange Scotland Memorial Hospital Treasurer Chip Shytle, left, and Board of Trustees Chair Jane Rogers, right, talk with state Rep. Garland Pierce before the start of Thursday’s annual community meeting.
Amber Hatten-Staley | Laurinburg Exchange Scotia Village Executive Director Allen Johnson talks with Scotland Memorial Hospital CEO Greg Wood during Thursday’s annual community meeting.

LAURINBURG — Scotland Health Care System leaders focused on the mission statement of the hospital during its annual Community Meeting this week.

More than 75 residents, board members, physicians, and health care system associates gathered at Scotia Village to hear of the system’s successes as well as its challenges.

Jane Rogers, Chair of Scotland Health Care System’s Board of Trustees, explained that each presenter would be touching on one aspect of the mission statement — Safe, High Quality, Compassionate, Sustainable the acronym for SHCS.

Rogers highlighted the high quality portion discussing the improvements and investments SHCS has made in their facilities and technology over the last year. The system’s featured capital project was a $2.7 million renovation of the Women’s Center which is nearly complete. Technology upgrades were done to both CT machines and installation of a new linear accelerator in the cancer center.

Scotland Health Care also partnered with a number of different entities including a five-year contract with UNCP athletics.

Chief Medical Officer Dr. Cheryl Davis shared how Scotland Health Care provides safe care through many initiatives that have been implemented in recent years. The hospital now does a daily safety call which has decreased accidents in the hospital, most notably patient falls by 56 percent over the last two years.

In terms of quality care, Davis touched on how SHCS was first in the region to offer 3D mammography, state of the art orthopedic technology for hip and knee replacement surgery and are working on getting virtual critical care.

“This is space age, we are able to hard wire our ICU to be monitored by critical care nurses in Chapel Hill,” Davis said. “In our ICU we can keep sicker patients here so their families don’t have to travel long distances. We’re able to monitor through a screen vital signs by critical care nurses, so they can consult the pulmonologist — which we do not have in our community — that can continually serve as a resource.”

Scotland Memorial received a 4-Star rating from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid for the safe and high quality care.

Treasurer Chip Shytle then dug into the numbers, showing that SHCS is a sustainable not-for-profit organization. Scotland Health Care System’s fiscal year runs from Oct. 1 to Sept. 30 and in that time primary care visits grew 21 percent.

Shytle broke down who comes to Scotland Health Care to receive treatment and 45 percent were county residents, 33 percent came from Robeson County and 18 percent were residents of South Carolina.

“In summary, 2017 was another exceptional year. We need to be thankful that we have a strong health care system in our community, especially considering both the economics of our community and the struggles that some other small to mid-size hospitals are encountering,” Shytle said.

The final speaker was Scotland Memorial President and CEO Greg Wood, who focused his report on the compassionate portion of the system’s mission statement.

“Superb physicians and providers do not choose to come to rural communities unless they are confident the level of care will meet their high standards,” Wood said. “Our retention rate for nurses has been between 10 and 12 percent over the last three years.”

Wood went on to explain how SCHS is working to eliminate waste, highlight staff accomplishments, and praise the system’s patient experience scores.

Scotia Village Chaplain Linda Nelson shared two stories about experiences she had while visiting patients at the hospital.

“A few years back a Scotia Village resident was rushed to the hospital due to complications from oral surgery,” Nelson said. “When we realized he wasn’t going to make it I started singing Amazing Grace with him because he was deeply religious. The nurses and the doctor working on him joined in with us and it just touched my heart.”

For information about Scotland Health Care System, its services and providers, please contact our Marketing Department at 910-291-7550, or visit us at ScotlandHealth.org.

Amber Hatten-Staley can be reached at 910-506-3170 or [email protected]

Amber Hatten-Staley | Laurinburg Exchange Scotland Memorial Hospital Treasurer Chip Shytle, left, and Board of Trustees Chair Jane Rogers, right, talk with state Rep. Garland Pierce before the start of Thursday’s annual community meeting.
https://www.laurinburgexchange.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/web1_IMG_3276.jpgAmber Hatten-Staley | Laurinburg Exchange Scotland Memorial Hospital Treasurer Chip Shytle, left, and Board of Trustees Chair Jane Rogers, right, talk with state Rep. Garland Pierce before the start of Thursday’s annual community meeting.

Amber Hatten-Staley | Laurinburg Exchange Scotia Village Executive Director Allen Johnson talks with Scotland Memorial Hospital CEO Greg Wood during Thursday’s annual community meeting.
https://www.laurinburgexchange.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/web1_hospital-IMG_3286-1.jpgAmber Hatten-Staley | Laurinburg Exchange Scotia Village Executive Director Allen Johnson talks with Scotland Memorial Hospital CEO Greg Wood during Thursday’s annual community meeting.
Annual Community Meeting

By Amber Hatten-Staley

Assistant editor