Wagram welcomes walkers


Lumber River Park hosts hike

By Beth Lawrence - blawrence@civitasmedia.com



Charles Gause with Lumber River State Park maintenance tells hikers how early settlers to the area used the river to wash clothes.


Charles Gause led hikers for part of the outing pointing out interesting sights along the way.


WAGRAM – A small, but adventurous group of Scotland residents took advantage of Saturday’s clear weather to head to the woods, enjoy nature and get a little exercise.

Wagram Recreation Center held what it hopes will be the first of many hikes in the Lumber River State Park. The event, organized by Bridgett Sampson recreational assistant at Wagram Recreation Center, is part of a new initiative to promote events outside the center.

Sampson’s goal is to motivate people to get outside and exercise and take advantage of the “valuable resource” that is Wagram’s state park.

“We hope to make this available every three or four months to promote health and keep people moving to get outdoors and experience what’s out there at Chalk Banks, that it’s not just somewhere to camp or canoe.”

Sampson was unsure what to expect for turnout on Saturday but was pleased with the small group that showed up.

Charles Gause with park maintenance led the six hikers along part of the three-mile Chalk Banks loop, noting animal tracks, birds and other points of interest.

John Lewis, chairman of the Wagram Active Living Center, joined the hike along with his wife, Celeste, to show his support for the recreation center and active living facility’s efforts. He said he also wanted to explore areas of the park that he had not previously seen.

“The thought of going over to the state park was attractive,” Lewis said. “Celeste and I have been for other events and we thought walking the trail would be and interesting thing to do.”

Celeste Lewis said the walk was a “great experience.”

“I didn’t know they had all those bridges and trails blocked out that well,” she said.

The park covers 9,243 acres of land and 115 miles of “scenic waters.”

Visitors to the park might catch a glimpse of wildlife like squirrels, blue herons, river otters and foxes. Trees in the park range from loblolly and long leaf pine to bald cypress and tulip poplar. The area is also home to several rare species of plant like Carolina bog-mint and sarvis holly.

Sampson is also willing to arrange group outings to the park for church groups or other organizations. For information call, 910-369-0686.

http://www.laurinburgexchange.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/web1_Hike2.jpg

Charles Gause with Lumber River State Park maintenance tells hikers how early settlers to the area used the river to wash clothes.
http://www.laurinburgexchange.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/web1_hike3.jpgCharles Gause with Lumber River State Park maintenance tells hikers how early settlers to the area used the river to wash clothes.

Charles Gause led hikers for part of the outing pointing out interesting sights along the way.
http://www.laurinburgexchange.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/web1_hike4.jpgCharles Gause led hikers for part of the outing pointing out interesting sights along the way.
Lumber River Park hosts hike

By Beth Lawrence

blawrence@civitasmedia.com

Reach Beth Lawrence 910-506-3169

Reach Beth Lawrence 910-506-3169

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